Singaporeans: If you commit serious crimes, you deserve to die

Oct 20, 2022 | 🚀 Fathership AI

For the first time, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) released full studies conducted on the death penalty, commissioned by the ministry between 2018 and 2021.

The report, released on Wednesday (Oct 19), show that the majority of Singaporeans and Permanent Residents (PRs) support the death penalty for the "most serious crimes" including drug trafficking and intentional murder.

According to MHA in a press release, the three studies are:

  • IPS 2020 - A study on attitudes towards the use of capital punishment, commissioned by MHA in 2019 and conducted by the Institute of Policy Studies

  • RSD2021 - A survey on the attitudes of Singapore residents towards the death penalty conducted by the MHA Research and Statistics Division in 2021 (RSD 2021), and

  • HTBSC 2021 - The perception of residents in regional cities on Singapore’s crime situation, law and safety, commissioned by the MHA Home Team Behavioural Sciences Centre and conducted in two phases in 2018 and 2021 respectively (HTBSC 2021).

IPS 2020 findings

Survey carried out between October 2019 and January 2020 via door-to-door household interview using the computer-assisted data collection (CAPI) system.

Key findings:

  • 74 per cent of 2,000 Singapore residents and PRs agreed or strongly agreed with the use of the death penalty for the most serious of crimes.
  • 58.6 per cent of the respondents were also in favour of retaining the death penalty in Singapore, while 53.7 per cent of them supported the death penalty in general.
  •  22.9 per cent expressed that they do not approve of death penalty in all instances.

  • 71.4 per cent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the death penalty should be mandatory for intentional murder,

  • 61.5 per cent agreed in relation to intentionally trafficking a substantial amount of drugs, and

  • 60.1 per cent agreed in relation to the use of firearms with the intention of causing injury.

RSD 2021 findings

Key findings:

  • 73.7 per cent of 2,000 Singapore citizens and PRs agreed that the death penalty should be used for the most serious crimes

  • 80.5 per cent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the mandatory death penalty was appropriate as the punishment for intentional murder,

  • 71.1 per cent agreed or strongly agreed in relation to the use of firearms with the intent to cause injury, and

  • 65.6 per cent agreed or strongly agreed in relation to trafficking a significant amount of drugs.

HTBSC 2021 findings

Key findings:

  • 87.2 per cent believed that the death penalty makes people not want to traffic substantial amounts of drugs into Singapore
  • 82.5 per cent believed that the death penalty is more effective than life imprisonment in deterring people from trafficking drugs into Singapore.

MHA summed up the studies as such:

"Overall, the studies show that there is very strong support among Singapore residents on Singapore’s use of the death penalty for the most serious crimes, such as intentional murder, use of firearms, and trafficking in substantial amounts of drugs.

There is also a clear view, both domestically and within the region, that the death penalty is effective in deterring people from trafficking drugs into Singapore and is more effective than life imprisonment in doing so."

Minority views

When the minority of 11.2 per cent in the RSD 2021 study was asked further about their reasons for disagreeing with the use of the death penalty for serious crimes, 43.9 per cent of them indicated that they preferred for offenders to be rehabilitated or given a second chance.

Another 23.6 per cent of this minority cited reasons that were pro-life.

A smaller group at 16.5 per cent believed that discretion was required in sentencing. This group is comprised of those who believe that the sentence should be decided case by case (6.3 per cent), the consideration of circumstantial factors (5.3 per cent) and the possibility of wrongful convictions (4.9 per cent).

The study also noted that 14.9 per cent of the neutral respondents who cited reasons related to disproportionate punishment had felt that drug trafficking and firearm offences were less severe compared to murder.

Experts weigh in on timing of release

Legal experts and sociologists say that with the release of these full studies, the Singapore Government is looking to demonstrate to both residents and foreign observers that there is still "a strong bedrock of support" for the death penalty.

"Given that you have so much news coming from outside of Singapore that criticises Singapore's use of the death penalty, it becomes important for MHA to demonstrate through (surveys) to demonstrate that there is still that strong bedrock of support for the use of the death penalty in serious crimes," said Associate Professor Eugene Tan from the Yong Pung How School of Law at Singapore Management University (SMU).

Agreeing, sociologist Tan Ern Ser from the National University of Singapore said that the full results could have been released due to the increased proliferation of online content arguing against the use of the death penalty. 

"I believe (the release of the studies) has more to do with a perception that an increasingly significant proportion of young Singaporeans is opposed to mandatory death penalty, especially for those convicted of drug trafficking offences, and who may be swayed by what they read of the mounting international pressure." 

Assoc Prof Tan from SMU added that having the results published in full, with the methodology and list of questions fleshed out, also leaves no room for doubt that the survey results were collected in a fair and objective manner.

"It goes back to the point of accountability and letting people judge for themselves… with the full study you can look at what sort of questions were asked," he said. 

Dr Tan, the sociologist, added, however, that while the full results could "win over" those who are neutral or somewhat opposed to the death penalty, it will likely not convince those who are strongly opposed to rethink their stance. 

"The gap is hard to bridge, just as life and death is not on the same continuum," he said.


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新加坡7人“换妻”迷奸案细节公布!妻子被下药,全程录像直播...

Nov 03, 2022 | 🚀 Fathership AI

几名新加坡男子,在网上论坛认识后,沉浸在性幻想中无法自拔。

为了满足他们心中变态的好奇心,他们开始筹划换妻,并下药迷倒自己的妻子,让其他男子强奸自己的妻子!

昨天(10月31日),这起轰动新加坡一时的罪案在新加坡法庭进行了审理,涉案的七人中,有四人认罪,其中一人当场被判刑。

因为情况太过恶劣,为了保护受害人法院并未透漏她们的任何资料。被告人的名字也全部用字母代替。

回顾这起案件,这些男子的行径着实震碎了正常人的三观……

新加坡这名男子迷倒妻子 邀请其他人强奸并直播录像!

新加坡本体媒体《8视界新闻网》报道,法庭文件透露这起案件的主犯,是一名化名为J的新加坡男子。

J今年52岁,有着一份正当的工作,犯案时是一名业务拓展经理。这些年他和妻子一共生下了三个孩子,一家人原本很和谐地生活在一起。

不过在平静的生活下,J内心里涌动着一些邪恶的想法。

终于,在2010年,他在一个网络论坛上遇到了很多和自己臭味相投的人。在这个虚拟的平台,J肆无忌惮表露出自己的变态性癖,并发表了想玩换妻游戏的言论。

在这里,他们一起分享了很多有关“换妻”的想法。

聊着聊着,有一天他再也忍不住自己内心的想法,问自己妻子是否愿意接受3p。不出所料的,J的妻子拒绝了这个“提议”。

不过,这并没有阻止J付诸行动。

在一开始,包括J在内的一些人纷纷在家中安装网络摄像头。之后,他们会挑选时间告知网友相关的账号和密码,让他们自行观看自己和妻子的性爱视频。

经过一段时间后,J还是不满足。

于是,在某一天他下药迷晕了自己的妻子,然后邀请其他网友来家中与其发生关系!

随着事态的发展,J越来越沉迷其中……2013年,趁着妻子身体不适的时候,J还偷偷换了药物,再次邀请朋友来家中迷奸妻子。

这次,J竟然还打开了网络直播!

沉迷于“换妻游戏”,J不仅仅是让别人和自己妻子发生关系,同时他也跟其中一名网友K“商量好了”,趁着K迷晕自己妻子的工夫和她发生了性关系。

在某种程度上,K的行为更加恶劣,他甚至自己充当了摄像师的角色,拍下了J和自己妻子发生关系时的整段性爱视频……

渐渐的,J的妻子在不知情的情况下跟多人发生了性行为,相关视频还被上传到网络。

在当时,引起了相当多人的关注。

换妻行为曝光报警 更多人牵涉其中受重罚

J本以为这件事可以一直继续下去,不料在今年,他的妻子无意中看见丈夫手机在播放视频。

在好奇心的驱使下,她看到视频内容,这才恍然发现:

在过去的几年里,丈夫在暗地里进行了多次换妻活动,而自己在不知情的状态下被多次迷晕,在和他人强行强行发生关系后还被拍照记录……

拿着证据,J的妻子当面质问K,而K也承认自己曾经和昏迷的她有过性行为,并将自己妻子迷晕交给J的事实。

在得知真相后,J的妻子立即选择报警。随着案件的调查,调查人员惊讶地发现,还有更多人参与其中。

其中,有一名参加了J“举办的”换妻活动的L,也对自己的妻子如法炮制。

在一次在作案时,L的妻子尽管被下药后蒙住眼睛,在中途清醒了过来。

但L居然并未因此感到害怕而终止犯罪活动,而是要求自己一名同事P直接强行跟自己妻子发生关系,幸而L的妻子及时挣脱逃离,才免遭摧残。

之后,P在一封信中交代了全部经过,并表示自己不知道受害人并不知情才犯下罪案。

但法律并不会因为他的解释而对他开恩,最总P被判处三年监禁。他是涉案七名男子中,第一个被判刑的男子。

还有四人也已认罪,等待下一轮审讯。相信在严明的法律下,他们肯定无法逃脱坐牢。

不过,涉案情节严重的K在落网后,一再向警方和法官说自己有心理疾病,并要求医生为其检测,意图逃脱刑罚。

新加坡心理卫生院诊断后,确认了K患有偷窥症。但在审理中法官认为K对自己的非法行为是知情的,依旧是犯罪行为。

K对法院的说法表示不服,并要求开庭申辩。

但K的犯罪事实已被揭露,并且为自己的行为供认不讳,加上此案件牵连甚广,性质过于恶劣,估计也是难逃法律制裁。


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