Summary

This man was living on $200 a month when he sold a 'worthless' blanket for $1.5 million

Jan 26, 2021 | 🚀 Fathership AI

He inherited the blanket initially because no one in his family realized its value, either. When his grandmother died, he had gone to her house to collect the books she had promised him. “Everything was already pillaged through by my sister and my mother,” he recalls.

The last bag in the house held two blankets passed down from his great-grandmother: a softer Hudson’s Bay blanket and the Navajo blanket his grandmother once laid out on the porch when her cat was having kittens. Krytzer’s sister grabbed the former, and the latter fell to the floor.

“I said, ‘What are you going to do with that?’ She said, ‘I don’t want that, that dirty old thing?’ I picked it up … put it in my closet and there it sat for seven years,” he said.

The Chantland blanket passed down to Krytzer is shown here in its original state. The blanket’s origins date back to 1840, when it was hand woven with dyed wool. Joshua Baer |Joshua Baer & Company, Santa Fe. All rights reserved.

For Krytzer, those seven years proved to be grueling. Though he had built a thriving career as a freelance carpenter, a car accident in 2007 brought that to an end.

After the crash, he spent the better part of a year in the hospital on dialysis. Nerve damage and microfractures in his left foot led to an infection and a worsening prognosis.

“I kept trying to do the best I could, and finally it got so bad they said, ‘Now we have to cut your foot off,’” he recalls. Despite the amputation, he was denied disability multiple times and as a result sent his children to go live with grandparents in Louisiana.

“I mean, what do you do? I had kids to take care of, no money, you know? Nothing saved up or nothing like that,” Krytzer says.

Krytzer’s left leg was amputated due to complications stemming from a car accident two years earlier. Loren Krytzer

Disability eventually provided just enough money to move into a friend’s shack in Leona Valley near Palmdale, Calif. Krytzer negotiated his rent down to $700, which left him about $200 a month to live on, along with whatever shared income came in from his then-girlfriend Lisa.

“It was rough,” he says. “I mean, we would literally go to Costco … and get a Costco hot dog and a Coke cause they were $1.50.”

Other nights he ate ramen and drank vodka to ease the phantom pains in his leg.

As dark as things seemed, a glimmer of hope came in 2011 when saw an episode of “Antiques Roadshow” in which an elderly Tucson, Ariz., man is shocked to learn that his First Phase Navajo blanket is actually worth around $500,000. The appraiser, Native American gallery owner and art collector Don Ellis, explains that the textiles were expensive even in their own era. They could cost as much as a high-status person back then made in four years.

Ted Kuntz (left) is moved to tears when gallery owner Don Ellis (right) reveals that his blanket is worth over $500,000 on “Antiques Roadshow.”PBS “Antiques Roadshow”

“I paused it and I went and got the blanket and I’m sitting there holding it. … I’m lining up the lines on the TV with the blanket, seeing if they match,” Krytzer says. They were nearly identical. “This guy is on TV, the appraiser says $300,000 to $500,000,” he recalls, so “I’m thinking maybe this one is worth $5 to $10 grand.”

Unfortunately, no one else did.

Overlooking the value of something priceless

Krytzer showed the same video to his mother, who had just moved in after selling his grandmother’s house. “She goes, ‘Yeah right … probably nobody would give you freaking $10 for that thing.’”

The first antique dealers Krytzer went to turned him away. Others dismissed his find as a run-of-the-mill Mexican blanket. The last place he tried pointed him to John Moran Auctioneers, a local family-run auction company that had built up a reputation for selling Native American artifacts.

“I looked them up online and they had an ad for bringing in items, like an open [appraisal] day,” he recalls. After a 30-minute drive, Krytzer put the blanket in front of Jeff Moran. It would become what is still to this day the single most expensive item Moran’s company has ever sold at auction.

Photos provided by Krytzer of his great-great-grandfather John Chantland (right) and his Mayville, ND trading post boosted the intrigue in the art community before the blanket’s auction. Loren Krytzer

“A lot of times a blanket or something will come to us and we won’t know the history of it,” Moran explains. It helped that Krytzer knew the blanket had been handed down for generations, starting with his great-great-grandfather John Chantland, a Dakota tradesman from the 1800s.

After Moran sent the blanket out for testing, the story seemed to line up. The textile was one of the finest and rarest Navajo chief’s blankets in the world, according to noted appraiser and specialist Joshua Baer, who was present at the auction six months later.

“This has only happened maybe three or four times with an unknown blanket where you see something and you know right away,” he explains. “You walk into the room [and] you can tell that you’re looking at something that is not just uncommonly beautiful, but that is still very much part of the time in which it was made.”

Jeff Moran immediately called his late father into the room when Krytzer revealed the family blanket he was looking to sell at an open appraisal day at John Moran Auctioneers. John Moran Auctioneers

Though Krytzer was told his verified Navajo blanket could fetch around $200,000, he needed money, and he was tempted by competing companies that offered to pay up front if he chose to pull out of his sale agreement with Moran just weeks before the auction date.

“I immediately went into crisis mode with him,” Moran tells CNBC Make It. “I said, ‘I’ll tell you what, I’m gonna give you an advance.’” On a Thursday night, Moran pulled off the 14 Freeway near Krytzer’s home into a Pizza Hut parking lot and gave him an envelope with over $9,000.

“I’ve done everything I said I would. Just stay the course,” Moran remembers telling him. Two weeks later, Krytzer indeed received a lot more than that.

$1.5 million in a record-setting auction

The auction took place on Tuesday, June 12, 2012. Moran had tempered Krytzer’s expectations as he headed into the room with Lisa.

“I was thinking [I’d] fix up my car a little bit,” Krytzer says. “I started praying, ‘Please be enough to buy a house or something.’”

Joshua Baer, the art and blanket appraiser, was in the room on behalf of a potential buyer. He likened the event to “a Fraiser-Ali kind of thing.”

Employees hold up Krytzer’s Navajo blanket at the auction in a packed room at the Pasadena Convention Center. John Moran Auctioneers

The boxing metaphor was apt: The auction lasted only 77 seconds. A quick but fierce bidding war broke out between a phone buyer and Don Ellis, the very same Navajo blanket enthusiast who had appeared in the “Antiques Roadshow” episode that inspired Krytzer.

“I have a reputation for going after and being interested in the very, very best examples in my field,” Ellis tells CNBC Make It.

The bids for Krytzer’s blanket climbed from its opening price of $150,000 to $500,000 to $1 million before topping out at Ellis’s final bid of $1.5 million.

“They had to bring over water and stuff to me and wipe sweat off my head,” Krytzer recalls. “I started hyperventilating because I couldn’t believe it. … Everything just went limp and I couldn’t catch my breath.”

Krytzer was brought to tears once the price of his blanket crossed the $1 million threshold at auction. John Moran Auctioneers

The happy ending came as a relief for Moran, too, who had gambled and turned down private offers in order to bring the blanket to auction. After fees, Krytzer received $1.3 million for a blanket that had, only years before, served as the catch-cloth for a litter of kittens.

“I would call the 1-800 number for Wells Fargo … and it would say, ‘Your balance is one-point’ and I would play it [on speakerphone],” he laughs.

Still, in the immediate aftermath of the auction, Krytzer says he was a mess. He got calls from distant relatives asking for a cut and suffered from frequent anxiety attacks. His sister threatened to sue him before backing down.

“It was just hard to grasp,” he says. “I mean, I worked hard my whole life. I was in construction, I never bought anything, I never saved, I always rented. I bought used cars cause that’s all I could afford. I lived paycheck to paycheck my whole life.”

After the auction he spent five days in a hotel alone to decompress.

Krytzer also purchased a Harley Davidson with part of the $1.3 million he received at auction. Loren Krytzer

Before he was set to receive his payout, Moran called and asked Krytzer to come into the office for a quick lesson on “the time value of money.”

“I paid our CPA for four hours to sit down with Loren,” Moran recalls. “We’ve come too far and worked too hard to not do this. … I wanted so much to change his outlook and his journey ahead.”

Most of the lesson took hold. Krytzer says he invested in stocks and some municipal bonds, as well as two houses: one $250,000 home he lives in with his now-wife Lisa, complete with a pool and a view of the valley, as well as a second property that he rents out.

“It’s like, I never had money before, but OK, what do rich people have? When they have this money, what do they do?”

He also splurged on some luxuries, like the 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 he bought new and souped up from West Coast Customs, the mechanic shop made famous by MTV’s “Pimp My Ride.”

Krytzer’s first big purchase, a brand new 2012 Dodge Challenger SRT8 couldn’t have come at a better time. His last car had over 200,000 miles and was burning oil. Loren Krytzer

“I never had nothing like that, so I wanted a nice car and I did, I bought one,” he says.

Then came the cruise to Mexico with his wife and her three daughters as a pre-honeymoon trip. “I had never been on a cruise ship,” Krytzer explains.

The money helped improve Krytzer’s health: He’s sitting around less and enjoying the outdoors more often with camping and fishing trips. “For the first time in years I’m actually able to walk with my wife and hold her hand down the street,” he says.

Still, overall, he says money hasn’t changed him.

“I mean, I have a home, a beautiful home, and several cars, but I’d give anything to still be working,” he says. “Sitting around even if you’re in a nice home or you’re living in a shack, you’re sitting around bored doing nothing.”

Krytzer says his doctors told him he had five years to live after suffering a car accident. Ten years later, he’s seen here enjoying a dune buggy ride with his wife Lisa. Loren Krytzer

And while Krytzer’s anxiety has faded away, his concerns about money are just as present as they were before. Since the windfall, he no longer receives disability payments and he has learned that even $1.3 million goes fast when there’s no more money coming in.

The $10,000 in insurance and property taxes he pays for his houses each year add up, too.

“We’re getting taxed to death here, I can’t afford it,” he says. “I’m from California, I grew up here, but without working it’s just hard to survive.” The couple is looking into selling their house and moving north to Idaho where taxes aren’t as burdensome and life is more affordable.

I never had money before, but OK, what do rich people have? When they have this money, what do they do?

“The taxes on the house is half of what it is here,” Krytzer explains. “I’m thinking if I can go there I can kind of keep what I have, buy another house ... and maybe try to get some kind of part-time job ... I’m just hoping that we can survive and keep going.”

Survival, Krytzer admits with a smile, has gotten a bit easier since the auction, which he credits for saving his life.

“I firmly believe I’m here because years ago I turned my life around,” he says. “The things I’ve been through, I tell people it’s a strong faith and a strong mind. Without those things you’re not going to make it.”

As for gallery owner Don Ellis, he went on to sell the Chantland blanket in 2016 to Charles and Valerie Diker for an amount greater than $1.8 million. While the Dikers previously announced a promised gift of their Native American art collection to New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the couple declined to comment on whether the Chantland blanket would be a part of that collection. That is set to debut at the Met in October 2018.


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新加坡7人“换妻”迷奸案细节公布!妻子被下药,全程录像直播...

Nov 03, 2022 | 🚀 Fathership AI

几名新加坡男子,在网上论坛认识后,沉浸在性幻想中无法自拔。

为了满足他们心中变态的好奇心,他们开始筹划换妻,并下药迷倒自己的妻子,让其他男子强奸自己的妻子!

昨天(10月31日),这起轰动新加坡一时的罪案在新加坡法庭进行了审理,涉案的七人中,有四人认罪,其中一人当场被判刑。

因为情况太过恶劣,为了保护受害人法院并未透漏她们的任何资料。被告人的名字也全部用字母代替。

回顾这起案件,这些男子的行径着实震碎了正常人的三观……

新加坡这名男子迷倒妻子 邀请其他人强奸并直播录像!

新加坡本体媒体《8视界新闻网》报道,法庭文件透露这起案件的主犯,是一名化名为J的新加坡男子。

J今年52岁,有着一份正当的工作,犯案时是一名业务拓展经理。这些年他和妻子一共生下了三个孩子,一家人原本很和谐地生活在一起。

不过在平静的生活下,J内心里涌动着一些邪恶的想法。

终于,在2010年,他在一个网络论坛上遇到了很多和自己臭味相投的人。在这个虚拟的平台,J肆无忌惮表露出自己的变态性癖,并发表了想玩换妻游戏的言论。

在这里,他们一起分享了很多有关“换妻”的想法。

聊着聊着,有一天他再也忍不住自己内心的想法,问自己妻子是否愿意接受3p。不出所料的,J的妻子拒绝了这个“提议”。

不过,这并没有阻止J付诸行动。

在一开始,包括J在内的一些人纷纷在家中安装网络摄像头。之后,他们会挑选时间告知网友相关的账号和密码,让他们自行观看自己和妻子的性爱视频。

经过一段时间后,J还是不满足。

于是,在某一天他下药迷晕了自己的妻子,然后邀请其他网友来家中与其发生关系!

随着事态的发展,J越来越沉迷其中……2013年,趁着妻子身体不适的时候,J还偷偷换了药物,再次邀请朋友来家中迷奸妻子。

这次,J竟然还打开了网络直播!

沉迷于“换妻游戏”,J不仅仅是让别人和自己妻子发生关系,同时他也跟其中一名网友K“商量好了”,趁着K迷晕自己妻子的工夫和她发生了性关系。

在某种程度上,K的行为更加恶劣,他甚至自己充当了摄像师的角色,拍下了J和自己妻子发生关系时的整段性爱视频……

渐渐的,J的妻子在不知情的情况下跟多人发生了性行为,相关视频还被上传到网络。

在当时,引起了相当多人的关注。

换妻行为曝光报警 更多人牵涉其中受重罚

J本以为这件事可以一直继续下去,不料在今年,他的妻子无意中看见丈夫手机在播放视频。

在好奇心的驱使下,她看到视频内容,这才恍然发现:

在过去的几年里,丈夫在暗地里进行了多次换妻活动,而自己在不知情的状态下被多次迷晕,在和他人强行强行发生关系后还被拍照记录……

拿着证据,J的妻子当面质问K,而K也承认自己曾经和昏迷的她有过性行为,并将自己妻子迷晕交给J的事实。

在得知真相后,J的妻子立即选择报警。随着案件的调查,调查人员惊讶地发现,还有更多人参与其中。

其中,有一名参加了J“举办的”换妻活动的L,也对自己的妻子如法炮制。

在一次在作案时,L的妻子尽管被下药后蒙住眼睛,在中途清醒了过来。

但L居然并未因此感到害怕而终止犯罪活动,而是要求自己一名同事P直接强行跟自己妻子发生关系,幸而L的妻子及时挣脱逃离,才免遭摧残。

之后,P在一封信中交代了全部经过,并表示自己不知道受害人并不知情才犯下罪案。

但法律并不会因为他的解释而对他开恩,最总P被判处三年监禁。他是涉案七名男子中,第一个被判刑的男子。

还有四人也已认罪,等待下一轮审讯。相信在严明的法律下,他们肯定无法逃脱坐牢。

不过,涉案情节严重的K在落网后,一再向警方和法官说自己有心理疾病,并要求医生为其检测,意图逃脱刑罚。

新加坡心理卫生院诊断后,确认了K患有偷窥症。但在审理中法官认为K对自己的非法行为是知情的,依旧是犯罪行为。

K对法院的说法表示不服,并要求开庭申辩。

但K的犯罪事实已被揭露,并且为自己的行为供认不讳,加上此案件牵连甚广,性质过于恶劣,估计也是难逃法律制裁。


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